Say “Aloha” to Productivity Increases: Ask the Hawaii Question

Say “Aloha” to Productivity Increases: Ask the Hawaii Question

A recent article in Entrepreneur suggested asking employees if they could wrap up work and get on a plane in five hours as means of gauging effectiveness on the job.

The Hawaii Question encourages employees to see their productivity for themselves. As many organizations move away from the annual review to adopt more continuous feedback cycles, questions like this one could prompt the inner monologue that drives improvement.

Amazon Leadership Principle 2: Employee Ownership

Amazon Leadership Principle 2: Employee Ownership

What does it really mean for employees to demonstrate ownership? Taking care of every detail? Stepping up to take blame and correct mistakes?

Amazon characterizes the best of employee ownership this way:

“Leaders are owners. They think long term and don’t sacrifice long-term value for short-term results. They act on behalf of the entire company, beyond just their own team. They never say “that’s not my job.”

The American Workplace: Still the Great Uniter

The American Workplace: Still the Great Uniter

The results of a recent Jobvite study of the workforce shows that one space where Americans are still somewhat unified is the workplace. The findings shed light on emerging trends and highlight some key areas where there are no surprises.

One key trend is that we are in the age of the “Hyper Hopper”—with job satisfaction rates on the decline (64% in 2017 vs. 74% in 2016), nearly half of job seekers are changing jobs at least every five years, particularly younger people, single people, and those who earn less than $25,000/year.

Vulnerability is Sexy

Vulnerability is Sexy

When was the last time you felt truly vulnerable at work?  Are you a CEO who feels comfortable using the words “I don’t know” with your leadership team members?  Have you shared some of your fears with them?  Have you allowed yourself to be human?

Last week, I had the pleasure of attending the annual summit of the Small Giants Community in Detroit.  For two days, 150 leaders committed to growing a business with purpose grappled with topics such as culture hacking, open book management, and leading from the behind.

When do you need to hire a COO?

When do you need to hire a COO?

After reading a blog post by Dale Robinette (thanks Dale!), we realized that we gave our readers advice on how to hire a new Chief Operating Officer, but gave no advice on when it is time for your company to find a new one.

Here are a few thoughts on when to hire a COO:

1) If your current COO leaves, you need to find a replacement. Most businesses benefit from having a COO, and trying to run a business without an operations leader is a risk most business owners should not take.

Toxic Culture

Toxic Culture

John Lankford, author of “The Answer is Leadership” wrote, “Values and norms are the building blocks of a company’s culture. Some companies constantly reinforce their defining principles by displaying them in strategic areas of the building. Other businesses treat them less formally, but no less seriously. In either case, every business – and, often, every team – has its unique “rules of the game” that ultimately define the overall culture. Whether formally displayed or tacitly acknowledged, though, if management approaches those values and norms as an afterthought, doing little or nothing at all to articulate them – the result will be deleterious. It cannot be overstated that your company’s culture is a reflection of its management team – always.”

Nasty Bankruptcy: Why a Founder’s Brand is not Enough to Build a Great and Lasting Business

Nasty Bankruptcy: Why a Founder’s Brand is not Enough to Build a Great and Lasting Business

Reminiscent of its .com flopping predecessors, Nasty Gal filed for bankruptcy late last year after raising tens of millions in venture capital. It was a fantastic fall from grace for the company. Yet the brand of its founder Sophia Amoruso lives on - through her best selling book, a popular podcast, and a new Netflix TV series. 

This divergence between company and founder success can teach entrepreneurial CEOs some important lessons: